Family Tree of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, the Great Sansi


Atam
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Kabir
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Karanweer
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Kamal
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Suraj
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Roop
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Dheer
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Garhpal
|
Kaul
|
Naresh
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Bhatti
 
 (apabhransha of Bhupati, the founder of Bhati Rajput sept)
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Narpat
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Jaspat
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Gajpat
|
Shalivahan
 
(A well known Bhati Rajput king)
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Sankh
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Deosar
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Mansoor
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Man
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Sal
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Jeondan
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Achal
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Jagpal
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Padam Rath
|
Sansi or Sans Mal
 (the founder of Sansi clan, Wichher and Bhoni were his siblings)
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Beehdoo
(Rasalan and Mahla were his siblings. Rasalan was his sister)
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Harar
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Udret
(ancestor of the Sansis who came to be known as Sukarchakias and Sindhanwalias)
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Sunder
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Kalu
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Jaddoman
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Galib
|
Kiddoh
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Rajada
 (Premoo was his sibling)
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Takthmal
 (Neeloo and Teloo were his siblings)
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Bhai Bara
 (Baloo was his sibling)
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Budha Sansi
(also known as Desu, owing to his picbald mare of "Desi" breed. He got baptized as a Sikh in 1692 A.D. and became Budh Singh)
|
Nodh Singh
(Chanda Singh was his sibling.   Sindhanwalias  of Raja Sansi were Chanda Singh's descendants, The Sardars of Sukarchakia Missal or Sukarchakias , the immediate family of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, were Nodh Singh's descendants)
|
Charat Singh 
(Chet Singh, Dal Singh and Manghi Singh were his siblings)
|
Mahan Singh
(Soojh Singh was his sibling. Mahan Singh was married to the daughter of  Gajpat Singh , the Chief of Jind, who was the great-grandson of Chaudhary Phul Bhati, the founder of the Phulkiyan Sikh state.  Phul Bhati was said to be the  29th generation descendant of Rawal Jaisal Singh, who founded a small Bhati Rajput  kingdom in Jaiselmer in 1156 A.D.)
|
Maharaja Ranjit Singh
(none of his lineal descendants now survive. The lineage ended with Maharaja Dalip Singh who died without a male heir)


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The Sansis, by many accounts,  have originated from the  Bhati Rajputs. The clan's history, however,  is full of vicissitudes. Bhatis claim origin from Krishna's clan.  After their expulsion from Rajputana by Allaudin Khilji , the Sansis appeared as an  offshoot of the vanquished Bhatis who took the title of the clan after Sans Mal, their consanguineous patriarch. The fortune and social standing of the clan underwent gradual deterioration from rulers to wandering gypsies and nomads , infamous in public perception as hunters , robbers and petty-thieves.

The fortune of a section of the clan dramatically  changed for the better again after Budha Sansi , formerly a cattle-thief and robber, got baptized as a Sikh and joined forces with the rebellious Sikh militants  who later on exploited the power vacuum in Punjab in the aftermath of Maratha-Afghan conflict to establish the independent Sikh Missals or confederacies. Nodh Singh and Chanda Singh, both Sansis and Budha Sansi's sons, founded the powerful Sukarchakia Missal.  Maharaja Ranjit Singh, the representative of  Sukarchakia Missal, united all the missals to form the powerful Sikh kingdom which lasted around fifty years.

The rest of the clan was however not that fortunate and got notified as "Criminal Tribe" in the colonial era.  The Sindhanwalias , the socially better off surviving Sansis, got allied with the Jats and a Sansi Jat clan was also  recorded in early imperial censuses, which were rather crude and inaccurate. But the numbers of this "Jat" clan were extremely small , indicating  it, at best,  as a very recent accretion into an inclusive and a heterogeneous fold , which represents  a functional  category , composed of diverse farming identities,  almost as often as it does an ethnic caste. Lepel Griffin , a contemporary of Maharaja, however,  clearly identified as Sindhanwalias as  belonging to  the same stock as rest of the Sansis, which is the same opinion held by many other historians of note.



References :
  • Griffin, Sir Lepel Punjab Chiefs, Vol. 1, p. 219
  • Singh, Sher (1965) The Sansis of Punjab: a Gypsy and denotified tribe of Rajput origin; Maharaja Ranjit Singh: the most glorious Sansi, p. 13. Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal
  • Latif, Sayed Muhammad, History of the Punjab, p.335  Cacutta 1891
  • Lethbridge, Sir Roper , The Golden Book of India: A Genealogical and Biographical Dictionary of the Ruling Princes, Chiefs, Nobles, and Other Personages, Titled Or Decorated, of the Indian Empire, p 215, Aakar Books, 2005
    
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